Send us Tips

Learn about the history of Green Lake Park, Ravenna Park, and Ravenna Blvd at the next FOGL meeting

What do you think? (5 Comments) April 11, 2011 at 7:35AM
Green Lake, 1913

Green Lake, 1913

Creative Commons License photo credit: Seattle Municipal Archives

 

The Friends of Green Lake (FOGL) are meeting on Tuesday, April 26, 2011 at 7 p.m. in The Hearthstone‘s chapel (6720 E Green Lake Way N). The meeting is free and open to the public.

Sue Nicol of Friends of Seattle’s Olmsted Parks will be speaking on the Olmsted plans for Green Lake Park, Ravenna Park, and Ravenna Blvd.  John Charles Olmsted began designing Seattle’s park system, including Green Lake Park, in 1903.

In October 2010, Nicol visited a FOGL meeting and presented on the history of Woodland Park and the Woodland Park Zoo. You can read about that presentation here.

In October, Sue Nicol spoke on the Olmsted history of Woodland Park and the Woodland Park Zoo.

 

5 Responses to “Learn about the history of Green Lake Park, Ravenna Park, and Ravenna Blvd at the next FOGL meeting”

  1. Ratgirl says:

    What a great photo! Do you have an idea what direction this photo is looking?

  2. Anonymous says:

    I believe this would have been taken from within today’s eastside playing fields:

    http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=green+lake+wa&aq=&sll=43.819907,-88.994028&sspn=0.070599,0.144882&g=green+lake&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Green+Lake,+Seattle,+King,+Washington&ll=47.679121,-122.328526&spn=0.004117,0.013143&z=17

    looking towards the southwest. In this larger version of the photo:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/seattlemunicipalarchives/3679050028/sizes/o/in/photostream/

    that would appear to be Sunnyside Ave N. on the far left (though it seems somewhat misplaced relative to the east shoreline of the lake, at least to my eyes).

    Note, there is a second set of tracks in the photo – part of the trolley system that ran around the lake – running where you see the poles snaking through the middle of the photo.

    The second photo here:

    http://community.seattletimes.nwsource.com/archive/?date=20050826&slug=pacificpdorp28

    shows the work a year earlier coming from the north side of the lake. Of course, that’s the Green Lake library in the background, built just a few years before in 1910.

    Incidentally, this photo:

    http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/zoom/html/2004177192.html

    , taken from Phinney Ridge looking east in 1913, may show what remains of the landfill trestle and work just below the shoreline at the top (then, again, I may be reaching!). Also, note the raised trestle in the middle of the photo (Paul Dorpat’s primary focus in the accompanying article: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/pacificnw/2004177126_pacificpdorp17.html) that was part of the trolley system that ran along the west side of the lake on its way through lower Woodland Park (just to the east of today’s Aurora Ave.) on its way to Woodland Park Ave. N.